RAILWAYS AND THE MILITARY


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During the Various conflicts in Indochina the combatants came up with all sorts of interesting devices to protect their trains. This page will look at some of those and whether they were effective or not.

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Locomotive Classifications

Steam Locomotives generally used the traditional French classification system. A steam locomotive with a 2-8-2 wheel arrangement is classified as 141 class, a locomotive with  4-6-2 wheel arrangement is classified as 231 class etc. To differentiate between different locomotives with the same wheel arrangement, the initial road number was added, e.g. 231-400 and 231-500. Some northern locomotives of Chinese origin were also known by their Chinese classification. e.g. 141 also known as ZL.

Diesel locomotives have a completely dfferent clasification system.

All diesel classes start with the letter 'D'  (for diesel or possibly dau may for engine?) then a number which I believe is related to the locomotives  power output. The third character defines  Electric' (E) or hydraulic  (H).

e.g. D5H class = Diesel + 500 hp + hydraulic.

Before 1975 in the south  diesels used the French system , e.g. BB for  Bo-Bo type locomotive then the initial road number. e.g. BB901 class.

In the North there appears to have been a mixture of different systems.

There is also a semi-official system where locomotives are classified by their country of origin. e.g D5H is also known as 'Ừc' (Australian).

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Railways in Vietnam website 2009-2013 David Gurnett

  Created November 9, 2013
All images remain the copyright of their original owners and are reproduced purely for the purposes of research.

Please feel free to contact me at railwaysofvietnam@gmail.com