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D8E
Bo-Bo Diesel Electric

D8E001
 
These locomotives were built  in Vietnam in 2002 presumably for use on prestige passenger services and were numbered 1001-1002. Only two were built and they seem to have been less than completely successful. As far as is known they are the only locomotives built from scratch in Vietnam. Only one seems to be currently in operation. They seem to have had a lot of trouble with the nose shape. Note the damaged and poorly repaired nose below. I caught a glimpse of one when I was in Saigon in 2009. No idea whether it was operational. The locomotives seem to have been designed to pull coaches painted in the same colour scheme (see images below), but in reality pull anything in the passenger fleet. They look vaguely like the British HST or the Australian XPT power cars, so I wonder if they were designed to 'top and tail' passenger trains the way that the HST and XPT does (see images at bottom of page). I don't think this has ever happened. At least one unit is currently being used on short distance local passenger services around Hanoi often with another class of locomotive at the other end.
 
D8E01

D8E02D8E-04
Above: These three small images appear to demonstrate the original plan for the class. The third image is probably the original for the 'photoshopped' first photo.

D8E05
Above: D8E downgraded to hauling a local train and looking a bit sad.

D8E002
DATA:
 
Class D8E
Country of Manufacture Vietnam
Year Built 2002
Year in service 2003
Number in Class 2
Road Numbers 1001-1002
Length 16577 mm
Width 2860 mm
Height 3910 mm from rail.
Weight 54367 kg (54.3 tonnes)
Maximum Speed 120 kph
Continuous Speed 11.7 kph
Axle load 14 tonnes
Engine Caterpillar CAT3412E - Made in USA
Engine Rated at: 641 kw/871 hp
Engine type V12 cylinder
Fuel Tank 1500 litres
Continuous Tractive Effort 105 kn/23600 lbs
Minimum Radius 95/75 metres


D8E03

Above: A less than pristine D8E-1002 hauling mixed coaches. Note damaged and poorly repaired nose and also the windows depicted in the 'ideal' photos at the rear to match the coaches never actually existed in real life or have been replaced with grilles.
Image Gallery

Click on thumbnail for full size image

D8E001tD8E002tD8E003t

D8E004tD8E005tD8E006t

D8E007tD8E009tD8E010t

D8E011tD8E012tD8E015t

D8E013tD8E014tD8E016t


01
02
03

Above: Three images of D8E-1001 looking a little worse for wear, by Nguyen Manh Tuyen.

04

06

07

Above: Three more images of 1001 taken by Vietnam Railways Forum member 'CADer' including a very rare rear shot.

SIMILAR LOCOMOTIVES IN OTHER COUNTRIES

HSTXPT
Above: Top: British High Speed Train (HST) Class 43 in original British Rail colours. Bottom: New South Wales (Australia) CountryLink Xpress Passenger Train (XPT) . Both locomotives are considerably more powerfull than the D8E and can run a lot faster.
 
Locomotive Classifications
 
Steam Locomotives generally used the traditional French classification system. A steam locomotive with a 2-8-2 wheel arrangement is classified as 141 class, a locomotive with  4-6-2 wheel arrangement is classified as 231 class etc. Pretty straight forward, except what did  if two classes had a 2-8-2 wheel arrangement I'm not sure. It didn't happen so wasn't a problem?

Diesel locomotives have a completely dfferent clasification system.

All diesel classes start with the letter 'D'  (for diesel?) then a number which I believe is related to the locomotives  power output. The third character defines  Electric' (E) or hydraulic  (H).

e.g. D5H class = Diesel + 500 hp + hydraulic.

Again, what happens if two classes are the same I don't know.

I am still investigating pre 1975 classifications. Some are the same e.g. 141 steam class, and some are different e.g. 'BB' class instead of D9E.

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Railways in Vietnam website © 2009-2013 David Gurnett
  Update November 10, 2013
All images remain the copyright of their original owners and are reproduced purely for the purposes of research.

Please feel free to contact me at railwaysofvietnam@gmail.com